CONCHITA CINTRON / by Molly Schiot

Known as "The Golden Goddess", Cintrón became the first female bullfighter (torera) to compete when she did so in 1936, at age fourteen.  Widely seen as the most famous female bullfighter in the history of the sport, Cintron gored over 750 bulls during her extensive career.  At a 1940 event in Mexico, Cintrón was injured by a bull and brought to the infirmary.  She refused to be taken off-site and later returned to the ring to kill the bull before collapsing. Her popularity in the sport was so great, that when she was arrested in Spain for entering the ring and  bullfighting on foot (only fighting from horseback was allowed at the time), the audience sprang to her defense.  As riots threatened to break out in the streets, the regional governor was forced to pardon Cintrón. Orson Welles, who wrote the introduction to her autobiography later said: "Her record stands as a rebuke to every man of us who has ever maintained that a woman must lose something of her femininity if she seeks to compete with men."

Known as "The Golden Goddess", Cintrón became the first female bullfighter (torera) to compete when she did so in 1936, at age fourteen.  Widely seen as the most famous female bullfighter in the history of the sport, Cintron gored over 750 bulls during her extensive career.  At a 1940 event in Mexico, Cintrón was injured by a bull and brought to the infirmary.  She refused to be taken off-site and later returned to the ring to kill the bull before collapsing. Her popularity in the sport was so great, that when she was arrested in Spain for entering the ring and  bullfighting on foot (only fighting from horseback was allowed at the time), the audience sprang to her defense.  As riots threatened to break out in the streets, the regional governor was forced to pardon Cintrón. Orson Welles, who wrote the introduction to her autobiography later said: "Her record stands as a rebuke to every man of us who has ever maintained that a woman must lose something of her femininity if she seeks to compete with men."