DORIS SAMS / by Molly Schiot

Doris Sams played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League from 1946 to 1953, during which she registered a perfect game and a no-hitter. She was soon a star and shared the covers of Dell publishing’s 1948 major league yearbook with Ted Williams — he on the front, she on the back. She estimated that she was paid about $4,000 a season. Sams took home several batting crowns, was named Player of the Year twice, and made five All-Star teams. Her contributions to the sport are highlighted in the AAGPBL permanent display at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY.  After retiring from baseball, Sams held an office job with the Knoxville Utilities Board. She never married and had no immediate survivors. In her interview with The Post-Dispatch, Sams said that a mannequin of Babe Ruth was on display near the women’s exhibit. “I look over to the right and see Babe Ruth,” she said. “I look over on the left and see Ted Williams. Then I look in the mirror and say, ‘What are you doing here?’ It’s all so unbelievable. I never ever dreamed our league would get this kind of recognition.”

Doris Sams played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League from 1946 to 1953, during which she registered a perfect game and a no-hitter. She was soon a star and shared the covers of Dell publishing’s 1948 major league yearbook with Ted Williams — he on the front, she on the back. She estimated that she was paid about $4,000 a season. Sams took home several batting crowns, was named Player of the Year twice, and made five All-Star teams. Her contributions to the sport are highlighted in the AAGPBL permanent display at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY.  After retiring from baseball, Sams held an office job with the Knoxville Utilities Board. She never married and had no immediate survivors. In her interview with The Post-Dispatch, Sams said that a mannequin of Babe Ruth was on display near the women’s exhibit. “I look over to the right and see Babe Ruth,” she said. “I look over on the left and see Ted Williams. Then I look in the mirror and say, ‘What are you doing here?’ It’s all so unbelievable. I never ever dreamed our league would get this kind of recognition.”