JULIE KRONE / by Molly Schiot

  It's a shame that Julie Krone is thought of as a great "female" jockey because this tag never affected her despite the sexism she would face around the stables and at the track. "I approached the sport like there wasn't a gender issue and I wouldn't participate in the mindset of 'she is just a girl,'" says Krone, who retired in April of 1999 with 3,545 victories and more than $81 million in lifetime earnings.  "No matter what any single person has, people are going to single you out and tell you no," Krone says. "My competitive nature drove me on despite all of the naysayers. I had to change my thoughts and not participate in the gender issue on their level. Every time my gender was singled out, I was challenged to beat that issue and prove that I was a great jockey. My perseverance wore down my toughest critics."

 

It's a shame that Julie Krone is thought of as a great "female" jockey because this tag never affected her despite the sexism she would face around the stables and at the track. "I approached the sport like there wasn't a gender issue and I wouldn't participate in the mindset of 'she is just a girl,'" says Krone, who retired in April of 1999 with 3,545 victories and more than $81 million in lifetime earnings.  "No matter what any single person has, people are going to single you out and tell you no," Krone says. "My competitive nature drove me on despite all of the naysayers. I had to change my thoughts and not participate in the gender issue on their level. Every time my gender was singled out, I was challenged to beat that issue and prove that I was a great jockey. My perseverance wore down my toughest critics."